KBEAR Ormosia Review

KBEAR’s new Ormosia is a dual-driver hybrid set of IEMs with a new shape and design. It comes equipped with a 10mm diaphragm dynamic driver and dual composite balanced armature driver on each side. KBEAR Ormosia has a classic straight-down wearing style.

KBEAR Ormosia comes with a dual-driver arrangement. It houses a combination of a 10mm dynamic driver and dual balanced armature driver on each side.

Despite having a two-driver combination, the shells are compact. They are made up of high-quality 6000 series aluminum alloy material crafted using a high-precision five-axis CNC machining process.

KBEAR Ormosia looks like a blend of modern elements in a retro fashion.

KBEAR Ormosia has standard MMCX connectors. The pair includes a 4-core braided silver-plated copper cable. The new Ormosia comes in two color options, red and grey.

What’s in the box

Features
  • Triple driver hybrid configuration.
  • Powerful 10mm composite diaphragm dynamic driver.
  • High-performance dual composite balanced armature drivers.
  • All-new cavity design.
  • Five-axis CNC machined aluminum alloy body.
  • Highly durable silver-plated copper cable.
  • Easy drivability.
Specs
  • Impedance: 16±2Ω.
  • Frequency Response Range: 20Hz-20kHz.
  • Sensitivity: 105±3dB.
  • Connectors: MMCX.

Price: $99

I would like to thank KBEAR for providing me with the review sample of KBEAR Ormosia (no affiliate link).

Sound

Bass

The bass is tightly controlled and clean. It leans slightly more towards the mid-bass and then starts to fall off as it transitions into the lower midrange. Ormosia’s sub-bass is pretty satisfying and although it has a light rumble, the bass overall extension is good.

The mid-bass and upper bass are a little less saturated than I prefer and while kick drums are punchy enough, I find that bass guitars and synth bass sound distant and at times barely audible. This is probably the underlying cause of the lack of engagement I experience at times with the Ormosia. It feels as though it’s lacking soul and groove. On the upside, the bass doesn’t bleed into the mids.

Bass is there, well-defined, and impactful, but I’d loved to hear more low-mids as I couldn’t get my usual kick on the go. That said, the Ormosia still managed to deliver deep sub-low, proof that it’s more about tuning than performance issues.

Midrange

Ormosia has a fairly forward midrange and above-average clarity. The lower mids are on the cooler side of the scale. Male vocals sound clear and articulate but lack a bit of power and body. However, in general, vocals and instruments sound fairly neutral and accurate. Guitars sound great making Ormosia a good choice for orchestral and acoustic genres.

As you must know now, mids are where Ormosia outshines. Everything seems perfectly on-point.

Treble

Fast transients are a hallmark of Ormosia. Snare drums are sharpened from the 2-4kHz rise and sometimes sound like gunshots which can be fatiguing over time. Detail retrieval is adequate but deteriorates along with the resolution during busy segments.

The focus is mainly on the lower treble but the upper extension is pretty good, resulting in a crisp, airy sound. It is a bit bright for my taste and sounds a bit splashy but thankfully, there’s no sibilance. Clean, unoffensive trebles. High-frequencies extension is good.

Looking good right? Sadly this is not the stock cable which is rather thin for my liking and to be honest I expected a better cable for a $100 IEM
Conclusion

Build quality is excellent, comfort is superb, and the sound is quite good, with impressive mids and vocals and when paired with a quality source you can definitely feel how well the Ormosia scales in sound.

The downsides? If mids are praiseworthy, lows and highs aren’t as magical. If they ain’t bad, they are not amazing either, particularly compared to their mid-counterpart. But, overall, there’s still a lot to love, and I have to say that I quite liked my time with KBEAR Ormosia.

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